Exhibition: Art House Artist Ginny Voedisch

2-Person Exhibition at The Celtic Knot, Evanston, IL

May 22-June 19, 2015

"YEARNINGS" OPENS MAY 22 AT EVANSTON'S CELTIC KNOT Neither Susan Romanelli, of Evanston, nor Ginny Voedisch, an artist of The Art House who resides in Skokie, is of Scottish descent, yet each artist finds inspiration in Scotland’s terrain, history and legacy. Paired together, their paintings, though stylistically different, create a potent sense of longing for a place cloaked in myth, romance and an essential, primeval wildness. Titled Yearnings, the exhibition opens on May 22 with a reception from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. in the Snug at the Celtic Knot, 626 Church Street, in downtown Evanston.   Prior to becoming friends, the women had explored Scottish themes in their artwork. Delighted to learn of their shared interest, the women decided to see what their paintings looked like side by side. They were surprised by the way in which the paintings resonated with one another despite the difference in their approach to the content. Working in acrylic paint, Romanelli creates landscapes that are simplified to their most essential, peopled by figures whose identities are veiled. Abstract and formal, Voedisch’s tartans look deeply at the mesmerizing play of color and line found in these iconic, woven designs.   The exhibition runs through June 19.

"YEARNINGS" OPENS MAY 22 AT EVANSTON'S CELTIC KNOT

Neither Susan Romanelli, of Evanston, nor Ginny Voedisch, an artist of The Art House who resides in Skokie, is of Scottish descent, yet each artist finds inspiration in Scotland’s terrain, history and legacy. Paired together, their paintings, though stylistically different, create a potent sense of longing for a place cloaked in myth, romance and an essential, primeval wildness. Titled Yearnings, the exhibition opens on May 22 with a reception from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. in the Snug at the Celtic Knot, 626 Church Street, in downtown Evanston.

 

Prior to becoming friends, the women had explored Scottish themes in their artwork. Delighted to learn of their shared interest, the women decided to see what their paintings looked like side by side. They were surprised by the way in which the paintings resonated with one another despite the difference in their approach to the content. Working in acrylic paint, Romanelli creates landscapes that are simplified to their most essential, peopled by figures whose identities are veiled. Abstract and formal, Voedisch’s tartans look deeply at the mesmerizing play of color and line found in these iconic, woven designs.

 

The exhibition runs through June 19.

Posted on May 14, 2015 .